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How to be successful on Twitter without 1000s of followers

 

WarwickTweetup blog.jpgTwitter is an incredible marketing tool as well as a great way for businesses to network B2B and B2C. It's live and fresh and perfect for driving sales to your website or business. But with all the facts and figures there's always one metric that people focus on - followers!


Here's why I think your number of followers is not as important, and why you should concentrate more on what you're tweeting.

I've blogged about follower numbers before and I’m convinced that it doesn't make any difference if you have 45,000 followers and I only have 10. I can still get my message to more people that count, more of the time, by using Twitter effectively.

Here's a scenario:

  • You have 45,000 followers all over the world, and they are an eclectic mix of individuals from all walks of life. You tweet about everything and anything and very rarely about your business or niche.
  • I have 10 followers who are all extremely influential in my field of expertise and have a great following, I constantly tweet useful and informative information about my niche which they share with their followers, who are also focused and optimised to theirs and my business.

Whose message is getting out there? You could argue that having 45,000 followers means you're going to be playing the averages game and are bound to have some luck sooner or later.

But...

If you're not consistently tweeting about your product or service, and your followers are not focused to your niche or what you have to offer, you're missing two very important parts of Twitter - a targeted audience and appearing in the search box!

The search on Twitter is a great tool and I'm sure if you're on Twitter that you've used it. Think about though. When you use it, who's at the top? There are usually 3 top tweets and then, in chronological order, every tweet with your searched query included. Twitter is totally up-to-date so the very latest people are there, not someone who tweeted your chosen search a while ago. So, if you only tweet about YOUR subject a few times a day, a week, or a month, you're limiting the times that YOU appear at the top, to people looking for YOU now!

Also, your followers won't be as targeted. By constantly tweeting about the same subject I'm gathering a strong, targeted audience who are interested in my main focus for tweeting.

Now who's playing the averages game?

Twitter School.jpgDon't get me wrong, not every tweet I type has the words 'Twitter' 'Blogging' 'Workshop' or 'Warwick' in them, that would be very off-putting to my followers who I like to converse with and build a strong community with. But, if I concentrate more on tweeting my four 'keywords' every day, then I increase my chances of being found.

Think about it. When you tweet about a specific word or subject you often gain a follower or two. Some accounts are set to auto-follow anyone tweeting about a specific word (spam followers do this for brand names), some people simply search Twitter for people who share a common interest. The more you tweet about your subject, the more chance you have of being found by people interested in it... so make sure you concentrate most of your efforts on Twitter to your reason for being there in the first place.

Twitter is a wonderful place, and I love it dearly. But there's a huge problem with it. It's very addictive and very conversational. Sure some amazing opportunities have arisen from tweeting photos of food or sharing a joke or two, but if you get too carried away you can waste hours of your precious time on it.

Stay focused. Stay targeted. Stay influential. Tweet about the reason you're on Twitter and build a targeted, powerful network of influential and loyal followers.

Trust me, it works!

Need help with Twitter for YOUR business? Contact us, we can help!

 

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My name is Graham Todd and I’ve been immersed in social media for almost three years. I train, blog and manage social media for business.

Find me on Google+

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